UPDATE: University Of South Florida Consolidation Takes Effect July 1, 2020 – CBS Tampa

UPDATE: University Of South Florida Consolidation Takes Effect July 1, 2020 – CBS Tampa
— Read on tampa.cbslocal.com/2020/06/30/update-university-of-south-florida-consolidation-takes-effect-july-1-4/

Cheers, David Brodosi

David Brodosi is an experienced team leader with a demonstrated history of success in the higher education industry. David Brodosi provides guidance on tech strategies and trends for state-of-the-art classrooms, course development, and faculty design support services. Mr Brodosi is recognized as a thought leader regarding the intersection of AV/IT, collaboration technology that supports his organization’s mission to deliver world-class research and tech solutions for higher education institutions.

david brodosi working from home
David Brodosi working from home

david brodosi and family travel to NY to attend conferencedavid brodosi and family travel to NY

david brodosi and family travel to NY

david brodosi and family traveling to NY

david brodosi and family traveling to NY
david brodosi and family travel to NY

Ground Rules for Learning in the Virtual Classroom

Spend time articulating how you expect learners to participate in the virtual classroom to set them up for success!
— Read on blog.insynctraining.com/ground-rules-for-learning-in-the-virtual-classroom

-David Brodosi

David Brodosi working remotely from a cabin
David Brodosi
David Brodosi in Alaska
David Brodosi in Alaska
David Brodosi and family on the beach in Mexico
David Brodosi and family on the beach in Mexico
David Brodosi and wife in London.
David Brodosi and wife in London.

5 Tips for Assigning Essays to Your Online Learners – LearnDash

Essays remain a powerful learning tool, if they are handled carefully. Here are five tips to help your learners gain the most from writting a course essay.
— Read on www.learndash.com/5-tips-for-assigning-essays-to-your-online-learners/

Nature & Travel Photographer – brodosifamily.me

Nature & Travel Photographer | David Brodosi is an amateur nature and travel photographer whose work showcases animals in natural landscapes – Photos of David Brodosi family, travel, outdoors, photography, adventure, wanderlust, nature, #brodosi David Brodosi is a senior-level specialist that leads strategic technological innovations and operations for teaching, learning, and instructional design at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg. David Brodosi serves as a point of connection between teaching, pedagogy, and the use of current and emerging technologies across classrooms, online courses, active learning labs, and other learning environments.
— Read on brodosifamily.me/

Training Tips from 11 Experts (Including Me) – Experiencing eLearning

TalentLMS asked me and 10 other folks in the learning and development world for tips for improving workplace training and elearning.
— Read on www.christytuckerlearning.com/training-tips-from-11-experts-including-me/

Cheers, David Brodosi

David Brodosi is an experienced team leader with a demonstrated history of success in the higher education industry. David Brodosi provides guidance on tech strategies and trends for state-of-the-art classrooms, course development, and faculty design support services. Mr Brodosi is recognized as a thought leader regarding the intersection of AV/IT, collaboration technology that supports his organization’s mission to deliver world-class research and tech solutions for higher education institutions.

David brodosi watching dog sledding David brodosi and family in Alaska shopping

David Brodosi

Photo of david brodosi traveling to Alaska in van

Links

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An Agenda For Research & Design

In today’s age of technology and the immediate access to all types of information, Connected Learning is learning with consideration of one’s personal interests and social environment. It allows the individual learner the opportunity to experience information and learning in a way that is relevant to them. It also ties the educational world and the social world in a way that inspires learning and creates participatory learning, not just a passive student. “To “learn from experience” is to make a backward and forward connection between what we do to things and what we enjoy or suffer from things in consequence. Under such conditions, doing becomes trying; an experiment with the world to find out what it is like; the undergoing becomes instruction— the discovery of the connection of things” (M Ito et al.) As it relates to digital media, Connected learning allows the learner to “connected” to the material in a meaningful way through the use of technology. This technology connects students to knowledge, resources, peer groups, and mentors not possible in years past. Connected learning also bridges the gap between social classes offering those previously without the means or availability to access equal opportunities for learning. “The basic premise of student-centered, engaged learning is that to make a truly equitable and democratic society, we have to begin with a form of instruction that is itself equitable.” ( Ashton, structuring equality) This is what makes connected learning so essential in today’s classrooms.

The research is clear: Learning is irresistible and life-changing when it connects personal interests to meaningful relationships and real-world opportunities. Below are a few videos from the Connected Learning Alliance. The CLA was launched by the Digital Media and Learning Research Hub of the University of California Humanities Research Institute with support from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation’s Digital Media and Learning initiative. The Connected Learning Lab at UC Irvine is its current steward.

In the article by Mizuko Ito, she suggests that “Connected learning is socially embedded, interest-driven, and oriented toward expanding educational, economic or political opportunity. It is realized when a young person is able to pursue a personal interest or passion with the support of friends and caring adults and is, in turn, able to link this learning and interest to academic achievement, career success, or civic engagement.” (M. Ito et al) In previous weeks we saw that computers were much more than a tool to facilitate passive learning. They were a portal to a new world and created a sub-culture that could not be ignored. David Buckingham perhaps summed it up best when he said, “In most children’s leisure-time experiences, computers are much more than devices for information retrieval: they convey images and fantasies, provide opportunities for imaginative self-expression and play, and serve as a medium through which intimate personal relationships are conducted. Recognizing this certainly means broadening our conception of technology – not least in education: information and communications technologies (ICTs) are clearly no longer just a matter of desktop computers, or indeed necessarily of computers at all. We need to acknowledge the fact that digital media are cultural forms that are inextricably connected with other visual and audio-visual media.” (Buckingham –digital media literacies) Again, it is here that we see the very essence of connected learning concepts. Technology has become part of who we are and must be considered part of our learning experience, not just a tool we can use if and when we need to. The ability to participate in learning has become a key factor in the success of this new culture and leads students to gravitate towards learning they can live, not just information they are asked to remember.

Participatory Learning is a concept that has been around for years and shares similarities to the Connected Learning Theory. As participatory learning requires the active participation of its members, so Connected Learning engages learners actively through participation and interactions. Of the key principles of participatory learning, the right to participate and the use of local knowledge and diversity are some of the same building blocks of Connected Learning. In fact, “Since the current generation of a college student has no memory of the historical moment before the advent of the Internet, we are suggesting that participatory learning as a practice is no longer exotic or new but a commonplace way of socializing and learning.” (C. Davidson) Therefore, participatory learning cannot be ignored when it comes to this generation of learners. How then does this affect the standard classroom? And where does participatory learning fit into the ever-expanding world of digital media technology?

Forty years ago learning was about studying, testing, and graduating. One chose a career path, studied the career, and then entered into the workforce. Today though, since information is growing at such a fast pace, the skills and knowledge necessary to be successful have grown too. “One of the most persuasive factors is the shrinking half-life of knowledge. “The “half-life of knowledge” is the time span from when knowledge is gained to when it becomes obsolete. Half of what is known today was not known 10 years ago. The amount of knowledge in the world has doubled in the past 10 years and is doubling every 18 months according to the American Society of Training and Documentation (ASTD). To combat the shrinking half-life of knowledge, organizations have been forced to develop new methods of deploying instruction.” (Siemens) This is what makes connected learning so vital in today’s world. Thomas and Brown discussed this very concept in their article, “Learning for a world of constant change,” The suggested that information is growing at such a fast pace that educators can barely keep up with teaching new content as it changes daily. Therefore, students, must become learners over and over again every class, and at every learning moment that is experienced differently than the last.“For more than a century, educators have strived to customize education to the learner. Connected Learning leverages the advances of the digital age to make that dream a reality—connecting academics to interests, learners to inspiring peers and mentors, and educational goals to the higher-order skills the new economy rewards. Six principles….define it and allow every young person to experience learning that is social, participatory, interest-driven and relevant to the opportunities of our time” (Educator Innovator – https://educatorinnovator.org/ why-connected-learning/)
References

Ito, Mizuko & Gutierrez, Kris & Livingstone, Sonia & Penuel,
Bill & Rhodes, Jean & Salen, Katie & Schor, Juliet & Sefton-
Green, Julian & Craig Watkins, S. (2013). Connected
learning: An agenda for research and design.

Davidson, Cathy N., et al. The Future of Learning Institutions
in a Digital Age. MIT Press, 2009.

Macbeth, Sarah. “About Participatory Methods.” About
Participatory Methods | Participatory Methods,
http://www.participatorymethods.org/page/about-participatory-
methods.

Siemens, George. “Connectivism: A Learning Theory for the
Digital Age.” International Journal of Instructional Technology
and Distance Learning (ITDL), Jan. 2005, pp. 42–58.,
er.dut.ac.za/handle/123456789/69.

David Brodosi

a photo of David Brodosi and family on a boat
David Brodosi and family

David Brodosi is a senior-level specialist that leads strategic technological innovations and operations for teaching, learning, and instructional design at the USFSP. David Brodosi serves as a point of connection between teaching, pedagogy, and the use of current and emerging technologies across classrooms, online courses, active learning labs, and other learning environments. Direct oversight of instructional design, videography, AV, and technology services personnel. As the department lead, David ensures that the University’s investments in teaching and learning technologies enable, inform, and serve continuous and innovative fulfillment of the University’s teaching and learning mission.

 

Social Impact of Technology

A64kNVfGj_VH4UAs we consider the readings from yesterday we see that they each take a different approach to the social impact of technology. Further investigation this today revealed similar perspectives on the technology revolution and its effects on our society. As a whole, these articles take a cautious approach to technology, and it’s artifacts and introduces a bigger picture when it comes to how technology controls our lives. The theories suggested seem to imply that we must not be glamorized by the ease and expediency of technology lest we run the risk of allowing those in positions of power to control our everyday lives further. Below I have highlighted several articles I researched this week and discuss how these connect with our previous readings.

First, the 14th International Scientific Conference eLearning and Software for Education in April of 2018 presented the article, Visions of Robots, Networks, and Artificial Intelligence: Europeans’ Attitudes Towards Digitisation and Automation in Daily Life. This research explored public perspectives and attitudes towards robots and technology in our society. It found that more than 70% of those surveyed believed that robots steal human jobs. However, 80% agreed that “robots are necessary as they can do jobs that are too hard or too dangerous for people.”(Cosima RUGHINIŞ, Raisa ZAMFIRESCU 2018). Unfortunately, 44% of those employed feel that robots threatened their current job which highlights the genuine social impact of technology. This article then, shares an authentic perspective society has on the impact of technology and suggests we must strike a balance between our needs and wants when it comes to technology.

Second, let us consider the article by P. Brey’s titled, “The Technological Construction of Social Power” This article suggests that technology both enhances and creates social power both intrinsically and derived from its artifacts. Said more simply, technology allows those in power to create a new power and or increase the speed and efficiency of their current power. This impressive display of control creates a behind the scenes view of technology which is not fully comprehended by the average citizen. We walk over to a computer, turn it on and do a Google search for restaurants, or access an ATM for money. What we do not consider is the ways technology truly impacts our social power, or how others use their social power to control us.

The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception possesses an exciting perspective as pertains to technology. In Chapter 8, author James Gibson describes the theory of affordances. This theory, in basic terms, suggests that all things offer benefits to animals/humans; and that these benefits can be perceived differently depending on who is using or encountering them. Using this theory when considering what technology affords society is unique. Suggesting that technology is in the eye of the beholder, while not a new concept, provides some individuality to this topic. Moreover, understanding that society does not possess a universal view of technology’s power and function implies more work needs to be done to educate people about the purpose and progression of technology.

Collectively, these articles combined with last week’s readings introduce a series of societal impacts of technology that not many have considered. From the fundamental human laborer perspective of Karl Marx to the political qualities suggested by Layndon Winners, there is no escaping the ever-growing impacts of technology. This is no doubt a cautionary tale for both the user and the creators of technology. Society, while admitting the necessity and benefits of technology must use it’s power carefully and in consideration of its impacts on society as a whole.

References

Brey, P. (2008). The Technological Construction of Social Power. SOCIAL EPISTEMOLOGY, (1). 71.

Gibson, J. J. (2015). The ecological approach to visual perception. [electronic resource]. London ; New York : Routledge, 2015.

RUGHINIŞ, C. c., ZAMFIRESCU, R. r., & NEAGOE, A. a. (2018). Visions of Robots, Networks and Artificial Intelligence: Europeans’ Attitudes Towards Digitisation and Automation in Daily Life. Elearning & Software For Education, 2114-119. doi:10.12753/2066-026X-18-086

The Social Shaping of Technology, 2nd Ed. (2000). Journal of Economic Literature, (1).

David Brodosi

a photo of David Brodosi and family on a boat
David Brodosi and family

David Brodosi is a senior-level specialist that leads strategic technological innovations and operations for teaching, learning, and instructional design at the USFSP. David Brodosi serves as a point of connection between teaching, pedagogy, and the use of current and emerging technologies across classrooms, online courses, active learning labs, and other learning environments. Direct oversight of instructional design, videography, AV, and technology services personnel. As the department lead, David ensures that the University’s investments in teaching and learning technologies enable, inform, and serve continuous and innovative fulfillment of the University’s teaching and learning mission.

#highered #highereducation #STEM #brodosi #davidbrodosi #brodosi #sunset #photography #nature #outdoors #family #david #travel

History of Educational Technology

In considering the early history of educational technology one cannot help but consider the works of B.F. Skinner. His experimentation and study of human behavior not only
contributed to the field of psychology but to the field of education as well. More specifically, his investigation into the way in which children learn in the classroom was
perhaps one of the first glimpses of educational technology. Skinner’s Teaching machine, as it was called, created an opportunity for students to receive immediate
feedback about their understanding of what they were being taught. They could be immediately reinforced for correct answers and be made aware of wrong answers at
a must faster pace than waiting for the teacher’s feedback or waiting for their paper to be graded. This type of technology in the classroom while exciting and new was
met with some skepticism. Society was perhaps not yet ready for a new way of learning and considered this type of learning experimental and impersonal and the cost of such machines made it impossible for wide speed use. Despite initial resistance, however, B.F. Skinner patented his Teaching Machine in 1958. And thus, educational technology was born. Fast forward sixty years later and technology-enhanced learning environments (TELE’s) are part of the growing trend to incorporate more technology in the teaching and learning process in support of STEM education (Wang, 2005). Perhaps Skinner was just ahead of his time.

 

What place do computers have in our classrooms and will they take the place of the human workforce? Teachers have forever been pillars of our society. After all, everyone working today was once taught a teacher. But what if, the future holds a different perspective? This week we looked at how students learn and how technology can support individual needs. Computers and advanced technology have certainly taken a front seat when it comes to assessing and meeting the needs of the individual learner. Computers can assess for understanding, adjust curriculum based on progress and remediate skills at lightning speed. In addition, immediate feedback technology provides is a fundamental concept in the behavioral theory of learning.

Indeed, behaviorism as a component of educational technology makes sense since behaviorist theories put the student in the center of learning. Since the very essence of educational technology is to meet the needs of the learner this seems to be the perfect fit. As an instructional designer “The developer of an instructional medium must know exactly what response is desired from the students, otherwise it is impossible to design and evaluate instruction. Once the response is specified, the problem becomes getting the student to make this appropriate response. This response must be practiced and the learner must be reinforced to make the correct response to this stimulus”(Burton, 2004).

Much discussion has been had about the effects of computers in the classroom. While some are for and some are against the dominance of computers in the classroom, others like Larry Cuban and Ivan Illich believe that a happy medium will best serve our students and classrooms through cooperation, collaboration, and direct teacher guidance. In other words, we can have both computers and teachers in classrooms. To be the most effective, teachers will need to infuse technology into their lessons and determine where technology can be best used. While applying key concepts learned or evaluating learned skills?

Further, In the article “The dubious promise of educational technologies: Historical patterns and future challenges” by Larry Cuban and Petar Jandric, the two suggest that not only are there society expectations about teaching and learning but there is also misinformation and lack of training and support which stand in the way of the effective use of educational technology in the classroom. “The gap in use of computers between school and home for teachers may be related to the above point and also linked to the lack of relevant software, on-site technical assistance, and lack of first-hand evidence that students will achieve more academically with electronic devices.” (Cuban 2015.) So to truly advance the direction of educational technology in the classroom proponents must not only provide the technology but make it relevant and useful for both the instructors and the students. Perhaps this is just another form of a roadblock that B.F. Skinner experienced in 1958. The technology is available, but out of reach for some to bring into the home or for schools to supply the support or training for educators.

Lastly, Seymour Papert’s Book Mindstorms adds a final element to this discussion. He says, “Two fundamental ideas run through this book. The first is that it is possible to design computers so that learning to communicate with them can be a natural process, more like learning French by living in France than like trying to learn it through the unnatural process of American foreign-language instruction in classrooms.

Second, learning to communicate with a computer may change the way other learning takes place”. And thus, not only must one consider the presence of technology in the classroom but it affects both the learner and the learning. If students learn in different ways, then the way in which we teach them will look different. A circular
argument indeed for an ever-growing field that should be personal, fluid, and flexible to change to meet the needs of its consumer (adaptive learning).

Bruno-Jofr, R., & Zaldvar, J. I. (2012). Ivan Illich’s Late
Critique of Deschooling Society: -I Was Largely Barking
Up the Wrong Tree-. EDUCATIONAL THEORY, (5), 573.

Burton, John & Moore, David & Magliaro, S.G.. (2004).
Behaviorism and Instructional Technology. Handbook of
Research on Educational Communications and
Technology (Vol. 2nd ed). 3-36.

Cuban, L., & Jandric, P. (2015). The Dubious Promise of
Educational Technologies: Historical Patterns and Future
Challenges. E-Learning and Digital Media, 12(3), 425–
439.

Edward G. Martin. (1981). Mindstorms: Children,
Computers, and Powerful Ideas Seymour Papert.
Science and Children, (1), 51.

Feng Wang, & Hannafin, M. J. (2005). Design-Based
Research and Technology-Enhanced Learning
Environments. Educational Technology Research &
Development, 53(4), 5–23.

Marinaccio, P. (2000). The children’s machine (Book
Review) (Undetermined). Educational Studies, 31(1),
69–71.

Watters, A. (2015, February 10). Education Technology
and Skinner’s Box. Retrieved from http://
hackeducation.com/2015/02/10/skinners-box

 

a photo of David Brodosi and family on a boat
David Brodosi and family

David Brodosi is a senior-level specialist that leads strategic technological innovations and operations for teaching, learning, and instructional design at the USFSP. David Brodosi serves as a point of connection between teaching, pedagogy, and the use of current and emerging technologies across classrooms, online courses, active learning labs, and other learning environments. Direct oversight of instructional design, videography, AV, and technology services personnel. As the department lead, David ensures that the University’s investments in teaching and learning technologies enable, inform, and serve continuous and innovative fulfillment of the University’s teaching and learning mission.

#highered #highereducation #STEM #brodosi #davidbrodosi